Healthy Diet

On Coconut Oil and Other Dietary Myths

On Coconut Oil and Other Dietary Myths

American Heart Association (AHA) recently published a recommendation on avoiding coconut oil consumption. The cause for this is scientific literature review showing this type of oil enhances LDL (bad cholesterol) levels, which can lead to higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

Why You Need a Nutritionist

Why You Need a Nutritionist

While some still don't know who a nutritionist is and what he does, most ask themselves whether they need it or is it worth the financial investment. Here I'll try to show why that's a smart move for maintaining and improving your health, both physical and psychological, regardless of your (existing or not) knowledge about diet.

Definition of a Healthy Diet – Part 2

Definition of a Healthy Diet – Part 2

In the first part of this short series I emphasized the need for an all-around definition of a healthy (proper) diet, and wrote about the consequences of the lack thereof. Today I'll define healthy diet using the effective, qualitative, and practical definition.

Healthy or Proper Diet

Healthy or Proper Diet

Terms healthy and proper diet are often interchanged freely. In practice, there is no difference, but I'd like to write a few words on their meanings. Up until recently I avoided the term healthy and utilized the term proper, simply because I hadn't completely made up my mind on what the definition of health should be. I still haven't, but sometimes you need to compromise.
 

College Diet

College Diet

During my college days at Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology (University of Zagreb), I had my lunch and dinner in the student canteen. I was warned almost instantly that canteen food was horrible, unhealthy, toxic, cancerogenic, other-currently-popular-words. Even though I supported this viewpoint in the beginning, as I educated myself more I started to question it.

Adolescents' Diet

Adolescents' Diet

Adolescence marks the period between childhood and adulthood filled with physiological, psychological, and sociological changes. It begins with puberty, but its ending is hard to define because it does not depend on the end of physical growth only, but also on cultural changes such as getting a job and moving out of the parents' home.

You Are What You Eat?

You Are What You Eat?

I hope that the question mark at the end of this tedious cliché made you click the article and read it. I've always had an issue with this statement. It is so widespread among fellow nutritionists, doctors, and of course, laymen journalists, that it is often posed (and, unfortunately, used) as the motto of nutrition science.